• Goya Awards

    Best Documentary Nomination
  • Platino Awards

    Best Documentary Award
  • Marseille Cine-Horizontes Film Festival

    Best Documentary
  • Cannes Film Festival

  • San Sebastian International Film Festival

  • ¡Viva! 20th Spanish and Latin American Film Festival

  • Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival

  • Morelia International Film Festival

  • Miami International Film Festival

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Spanish with English subtitles

With Carlos Hipólito (Narrator)

“Co-produced by Pedro Almodóvar’s production company El Deseo and veteran Spanish producer Enrique Cerezo, this illuminating survey was put together by Diego Galán, a noted Spanish film critic and former director of San Sebastian Film Festival. Reflecting changes in the political sphere, Barefoot in the Kitchen chronicles how Spanish cinema has portrayed the evolution of women from the 1930s to the present day, using film fragments from 180 movies. Galán demonstrates how landmarks in the recent history of Spain can be directly indicated by shifts in social mores in cinema. By the time of All About My Mother(1999), women had turned the tables on men and on cinematic sexism, present since the early days of the talkies.” – Jaie Laplante, Miami International Film Festival.

BAREFOOT IN THE KITCHEN IS ONE OF THE MANY FILMS INCLUDED IN THE CATALOGUE OF SPANISH FILM CLUB. SFC AFFILIATED UNIVERSITIES CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A SPECIAL PRICE OF $99 IF THE TITLE HAS BEEN INCLUDED IN THEIR SFC FESTIVAL. PLEASE CONTACT SFC STAFF AT FILMCLUB@PRAGDA.COM FOR MORE DETAILS.

About the Director
Diego Galán has written several books on cinema, including Jack Lemmon nunca cenó aquí (2001), in which he narrates his experiences as a director of the San Sebastian Festival, a position he held in two stages (1986-1989 and 1995-2000). He has directed several TV series: Memorias del cine español (1977), Queridos cómicos (1992) and Una historia de Zinemaldia (2010), in collaboration with Carlos Rodríguez; the documentaries, Pablo G. del Amo, un montador de ilusiones (2005), presented in Zabaltegi at San Sebastian, ¿Quién fue Pilar Miró? (2011), and the episode Epílogo for the anthology film Hay motivo (2004). Con la pata quebrada was presented in the Cannes Classics section at the Festival de Cannes 2013.
Press

“A detailed and delicious study of the role of women in our cinema, and our country [Spain].” – José María Clemente, VANITY FAIR

“You can tell that Barefoot in the Kitchen was made with love and sense of humor, add up the fact that many of this films have an implicit comedic tone better appreciated from today’s perspective.” – Rau García, LA CRITICA NEW YORK CITY

“[Diego Galan's] contention is that popular cinema implicitly reveals something of contemporaneous social circumstances, whether it intends to or not, and that therefore Spain’s tumultuous 20th-century and the concurrent prevailing attitudes towards women are reflected in its cinema and female characters.” – Rebecca Naughten, EYE FOR FILM

“The rhythm and intelligence of the editing, by Juan Barrero, which first follows a chronological order, but that later starts jumping from decade to decade according to theme, backwards and then forward (same as Spain, which sometimes goes retraces the steps forward it had managed to take), and Carlos Hipólito’s voice off reinforce the documentary tone.” – Rau García, LA CRITICA NEW YORK CITY

“The film is recommended for film and women’s studies undergraduates.” – Linda Frederiksen, Educational Media Reviews Online (EMRO)

“If cinema is a reflection of a culture’s ideals, customs, and stories, then the ways that women are portrayed in film are also fairly accurate mirrors of those views.” – Linda Frederiksen, Educational Media Reviews Online (EMRO)

Notes on Film

It is said that the only successful revolution of the 20th century has been women’s liberation. Obviously, this refers to the western world where the voting right, access to managing positions and the liberation of sexual habits has resulted in a copernican shift in women’s situation… and there’s still a long road ahead. I single out Spain for having been and being a traditionally sexist country. The title, which comes from an illuminating saying, “La mujer casada y honesta, con la pata quebrada y en casa”, doesn’t seem to have an identically brutish equivalent in any language. In French, the most similar translation we’ve found is “Retourne à tes fourneaux” and, in English, “Barefoot and in the kitchen”. Nothing as categorical as the hispanic phrase.

Because of this, I focused on the Spanish filmography to make to the film. Cinema, whether you like it or not, always reflects reality or part of it, and Spanish films have, at every moment, mirrored the political climate of the country and its customs. In the thirties, the dethroned King put in place a Republic that put women on the same level as men. The civil war divided the country, women included, into two sides, and the fascists’ victory returned them to their place: the home, “barefoot and in the kitchen”. After Franco’s death, the woman joined the struggle for freedom already in motion in the world; and continues to struggle.

We’ve used fragments of 180 feature films and some documentaries with a sense of humor and dynamic editing. Not all the films I would have liked are featured, but I think the ones that do appear are very signficant. Unfortunately, some of the original negatives have disappeared, and we’ve had to use low-quality copies.

Regardless, Barefoot in the Kitchen intends to inform and entertain. Hopefully we’ve achieved it.

Diego Galán